Monday, 14 January 2019

Practical tips for stain removal

Happy New Year! I know it's been long since I found proper time to update the blog, but writing a book and working hard to progress with my career whilst caring for two children is not an easy task. Have I said that many times before??? Apologies :DDDDD. Having said that I am preparing a series of very interesting articles that I'll be posting throughout January and February 2019. I leave you with a few 'spoilers', though. There'll be an article on Nematomorpha, on blockchain and antimicrobial drug resistance, on limonene air sprays, on inflammation, on Sjogren's syndrome (this one you cannot miss as I'm the Guinea Pig in the experiment), one on anti-psychotics and a chronicle/essay on the job market/immigration (I know I always said I avoid any political stance in this blog but there's a moment we have to discur on what is being done to humanity when it does affect us all). As you see, it is a wonderful time for visiting The Toxicologist Today and this couple of months will deliver incredible information for those with genuine interest in science.

But because I do not want you to leave empty-handed I thought of making use of information that, back in Portugal, at around Christmas-Time-meets-New-Year is given to farmers by a periodical (annual, I guess, can't really say :/) agricultural newspaper. This time I found that they were publishing incredibly useful info concerning...


BEST PRACTICAL TIPS FOR STAIN REMOVAL

[Disclaimer - I was not able to verify any of the tips the table contains and that the authors shared with the public. Some mixtures might produce noxious gases, damage surfaces, be flammable or cause harm if not handled correctly; therefore I recommend common-sense and caution if you happen to decide on trying any of the tips at your own risk. Instead of expecting me to go double check the science behind these approximately 50 different tips, why don't you just individually ask me to do the ones you are really interested in. Because time is money and we all need it, when you send in your request, please also visit the different ads that you can find within the blog as they help me maintain the blog alive!!!].

Stain To Remove
From Surface
With Removal Product
How to do it
Plaster
Floor
Vinegar
Eliminate plaster debris by scrubbing the surface with a cloth soaked in vinegar
Fat
Suede
Ether
Scrub with a cloth soaked in ether
Fat
Leather
Turpentine
Scrub with a cloth soaked in essence of turpentine
Fat
Tile
Ammonia
Scrub with a sponge soaked in ammonia and hot water
Fat
Ceramics
Ammonia
Eliminate stain with cotton soaked in ammonia
Fat
Wool
Turpentine
Scrub with a sponge moist in turpentine
Fat
Cotton
Petrol
Dissolve stain with a cloth soaked in a lighter’s petrol, then wash and rinse
Fat
Synthetic fabrics
Ether
Dissolve stain with ether, then wash and rinse
Fat
Marble
Petrol
Rub stain with gasoline and rinse
Damp
Fabrics
Ammonia
Rinse with ammonia dissolved in water (one spoon per litre)
Damp
Delicate fabrics
Milk
Soak with milk and rub, then wash
Damp
Resistant Fabrics
Lemon
After humidifying with some water, apply a boiled mixture of lemon juice and talcum powder
Iodine
Fabrics
Alcohol
Dissolve the stain with alcohol and rinse with water and ammonia
Mud
Marble
Hydrogen Peroxide
Soak with hydrogen peroxide until stain disappears
Mercury solution
Fabrics
Alcohol
Dilute stain in alcohol and rinse
Mould
Tile
Bleach
Apply bleach until stain disappears
Mould
Ceramics
Bleach
Eliminate stain with cotton soaked in bleach
Nicotine
Fabrics
Alcohol
Dilute stain with alcohol and rinse, but before make sure you try it on a hidden part of the fabrics so to check effect on colours
Oil
Cotton
Purified Petrol
If the stain is a recent one, powder with talcum to absorb the fat. Then rub the stain with a cloth soaked in purified petrol (from a lighter, for example) and wash with water and soap
Oil
Linen
Purified Petrol
If the stain is a recent one, powder with talcum to absorb the fat. Then rub the stain with a cloth soaked in purified petrol (from a lighter, for example) and wash with water and soap
Oil
Linen
Turpentine
If the stain is a recent one, powder with talcum to absorb the fat. Then rub the stain with a cloth soaked in turpentine and wash with water and soap
Oil
Synthetic Fabrics
Turpentine
Dilute stain with ether and then wash with normal detergent
Oil
Silk
Ammonia
If stain does not require dry cleaning, just add water with a spoon of ammonia to the washing up
Oil
Carpet
Trichloroethene
If the stain is a recent one, powder with talcum to absorb the fat. Then rub the stain with a cloth soaked in trichloroethene and wash with a carpet-washing shampoo
Oil
Paper
Talcum
Powder with talcum and apply a hot-ironed blotting paper
Oil
Washable paint surface
Ammonia
Dilute a spoon of ammonia with another one of detergent in a litre of water and scrub with a cloth. Then rinse with clean water.
Oil
Leather
Rub with
Rub with ether-soaked cotton, then apply cream or wax to hydrate and shine up
Oil
Waxed wood
Turpentine
Rub with a turpentine-soaked cloth then apply cream or wax to hydrate and shine up
Oil
Varnished wood
Petrol
If the stain does not go with detergent and ammonia, clean with petrol
Oil
Alabaster
Turpentine
Apply talcum to absorb as much fat as possible, then rub with a turpentine-soaked cotton and apply silicon wax to hydrate and shine up
Oil
Marble
Turpentine
Apply talcum to absorb as much fat as possible, then rub with a turpentine-soaked cotton and apply silicon wax to hydrate and shine up
Egg
Silver
Lemon
Remove the black stains egg leaves on silver surfaces by scrubbing with the half of a lemon
Egg
White Fabrics
Hydrogen peroxide
Wash with cold water using a spoon of hydrogen peroxide per litre of water
Egg
Coloured Fabrics
Ammonia
Wash with cold water using a spoon of hydrogen peroxide per litre of water
Egg
Pavement/Flooring
Ammonia
Add ammonia to water mixed with a floor-washing product
Oxide
Iron
Coke drink
Dip it in Coke soda, then use a soft abrasive,  and then brighten up with oil
Oxide
Iron
Soya oil
Mix soya oil with burned wood ashes and rub with a woollen cloth
Oxide
Iron
Petrol
Leave it in a mixture of petrol and oil, and then rub with a gentle abrasive
Oxide
Ceramics
Oxalic acid
Eliminate the stain  by rubbing with an oxalic acid-soaked cotton
Oxide
Ceramics
Vinegar
Soak with vinegar and non-refined salt
Oxide
Copper
Vinegar
Clean with a soft abrasive cloth soaked in a mixture of vinegar and non-refined salt
Oxide
Copper
Bleach
For deep-sitting stains ‘cook’ the object on a mixture of water and bleach
Oxide
Marble
Vinegar
Rub with vinegar-soaked pumice-stone
Oxide
Fabrics
Lemon
Rub the stains with lemon and add salt

Post Photo by Brina Blum on Unsplash